Patient Resource Center

1241 N Lee Trevino El Paso, TX 79907 Phone: (915)544-7144 Fax: (915)544-0355
1473 E. Amador Las Cruces, NM 88001 Phone: (575)526-5527 Fax: (575)526-5435
1204 Columbus Rd. Deming, NM 88030 Phone: (575)544-4067 Fax: (575)544-3796
1705 Indian Wells Rd. Alamogordo, NM 88311 Phone: (575)434-0207 Fax: (575)434-4523
305 W. McGaffey St. Roswell , NM 88203 Phone: (575)623-0799 Fax: (575)208-0505


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Health Issues

Arthritis Living Your Life

The degree to which rheumatoid arthritis affects your daily activities depends in part on how well you cope with the disease. Talk to your doctor or nurse about strategies for coping. With time you'll find what strategies work best for you. In the meantime, try to: 

  • Take control. With your doctor, make a plan for managing your arthritis. This will help you feel in charge of your disease. Studies show that people who take control of their treatment and actively manage their arthritis experience less pain and make fewer visits to the doctor.
  • Know your limits. Rest when you're tired. Rheumatoid arthritis can make you prone to fatigue and muscle weakness. A rest or short nap that doesn't interfere with nighttime sleep may help. 
  •  Connect with others. Keep your family aware of how you're feeling. They may be worried about you but might not feel comfortable asking about your pain. Find a family member or friend you can talk to when you're feeling especially overwhelmed. Also connect with other people who have rheumatoid arthritis — whether through a support group in your community or online. 
  •  Take time for yourself. It's easy to get busy and not take time for yourself. Find time for what you like, whether it's time to write in a journal, go for a walk or listen to music. Use this time to relieve stress and reflect on your feelings.

With your doctor, make a plan for managing your arthritis. This will help you feel in charge of your disease. Studies show that people who take control of their treatment and actively manage their arthritis experience less pain and make fewer visits to the doctor.